Visioning Meeting III - May 18, 2015

The third visioning session was held on Monday, May 18 at 7 p.m. at the Fire Station, 6767 Havens Corners Road. At the meeting, we recapped all of the previous visioning sessions and formed steering committees to focus on elements of the comprehensive plan and to act as a sounding board. These committees are comprised of mostly township residents and are still open to new members.  

Steering Committees:

  • Infrastructure - Roads, Parks, Trails
  • Public Safety - Fire, EMS, Law Enforcement
  • Sustainability - Land Use and Economic Development
Visioning Meeting II - April 23, 2015

The second visioning session was held on April 23, 2015. Similar to the first visioning session, Mike Anderson gave a short presentation about the need for a comprehensive plan, recapped previous visioning/planning meetings, and participants were asked to introduce themselves and provide a brief statement of what they love about Jefferson Township. Answers included quality of life, privacy, rural character and convenience to more urbanized locations.

The presentation gave a brief overview of the implications of the recent repeal of the State of Ohio Estate Tax, which significantly impacted Township revenue. A series of options were presented that could help the Township address this revenue gap, which included encouraging more commercial development to reduce the burden on residential property owners in the Township, encouraging specific uses that would be subject to excise taxation, and the possibility of passing a levy. 

After the presentation, participants were asked to identify the implication of encouraging commercial development. The benefits were identified as increased tax revenue and more options for goods and services. The drawbacks were listed as space constraints, traffic impact, stress on Township services, and aesthetics. it was noted that we must work to strike a balance between rural character and commercial and industrial development so as not to sacrifice the character of Jefferson Township. 

Participants were then asked to identify types of uses that they would personally support if they were located within the Township. Answers included restaurants (healthy, casual, upscale), coffee shops, a small natural food market, salons/barber shops, unique small businesses, bed and breakfasts, microbreweries, veggies drink stand. When asked where these items should be located, the consensus was that these businesses should be centrally located and be accessible by walking/bike paths, as well as by automobile.

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Visioning Meeting I - March 12, 2015

Trustee Claire Yoder and staff planner, Mike Anderson hosted the first visioning session on March 12, 2015. After a short presentation about the need for a comprehensive master plan, participants were asked to introduce themselves and provide a brief statement related to what they love about Jefferson Township. Answers included quality of life, safety, quiet environment, rural character, convenience to more urbanized locations and family history. After this exercise, a visual survey was revealed: a series of photographs of elements that could become part of the community in the future. It was explained that we not proposing any of these things, nor are they related to any coming developments; our goal was to know what participants value for the future of the Township. 

To summarize the results of the visual survey, participants were generally in favor of concentrated commercial development (urban commercial center, a "Main Street USA" commercial corridor), opportunities for outdoors dining and coffee shops, event hall/barn, outdoor event space, a retreat/conference center, farmstands, walking/biking paths of all sorts and community signboards. 

Participants were generally not in favor of conventional commercial uses (gas stations, strip retail, hotels), entertainment uses (Jazz venue/small concert venue/cafe, art gallery), public art or public transportation.

The results were collected and discussed at the meeting, Anderson explained the need for a diverse tax base, which would included more commercial development, as a predominately residential tax base will not be sustainable for future growth, and that the Township and stakeholders will have to carefully consider these issues moving forward into the comprehensive plan.